Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2
are headed here to washington today to tell president obama their thoughts on the fiscal cliff. the bipartisan group says both sides need to work together to avoid the tax increases and spending cuts due to kick in at the end of the year. >> no one's going to get what they want, but as a country to move forward, we've got to figure out who gives where, and if everything is going to be out on the table, how do we negotiate that? >> reporter: republicans have given a counterproposal to the president's plan which he issued last week. they say their plan would cut $2.2 trillion from the federal deficit over ten years. with $600 billion in health care cuts, $300 billion in cuts to mandatory spending and another $300 billion in cuts to other federal spending. the biggest difference between the republican plan and the president's remains taxes and how the government can generate more revenue to pay down the debt. >> rates have to rise on the top 2%. there's no other way to do it. >> reporter: president obama says his plan will raise taxes on the rich, bringing in $1.6 trillion. republ
back the cliff, the tax increases and spending cuts. the second is the debt ceiling. and the third thing is the path to fiscal sustainability, the long-term deficit reduction, tax reform, reforms to the entitlement programs that get to us a stable g.d.p. in the future. and that has to all be done at once. i don't think you can do this in parts. >> schieffer: let me ask the question which i'm sure there is no answer to, but what do you all think is most likely to happen? >> i think we're going to go over the cliff for a couple weeks, fingers crossed, we're then going to have a deal because there will be a political reset allowing both sides to be able to make nice with their caucuses and still make some progress on the issues of both begunnering more revenue and doing entitlement reform. >> i feel like a two-part deal this includes the republicans agreeing to a rate increase but allowing them a bookdoor to explain how to get out of that in the future which gives them a way to vote for tax rate increase will be very have, hard to do. >> schieffer: you think in the end they'll do that
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2